Tax rates in Europe   TAUX  IMPOSITION EN EUROPE

Country Corporate tax Maximum income tax rate Standard VAT rate
Albania[2] 15% 10% 20%
Austria 25% 55%[3] 20%[4]
Belarus 18% 15% 20%[2]
Belgium[5] 33.99% 50% (excluding 13.07% social security paid by the employee and also excluding 32% social security paid by the employer) 21% (reduced rates of 6% and 12%)[4]
Bosnia and Herzegovina[6] 10% 15% (0–15% per location) 17%
Bulgaria[7] 10% 10% 20%[4]
Croatia 20% 40% (excluding 35.2% total sum of insurances levied on income) 25% (reduced rate of 13%)[8]
Cyprus 12.5% 35% 19% (reduced rates of 8% and 5%)[9]
Czech Republic 19% 22% 21% (reduced rates of 15% and 10%)[4]
Denmark 22% 55.56% (including 8% social security paid by the employee but excluding 0.42–1.48% church tax imposed on members of the national Church of Denmark) 25% (reduced rate 0% on transportation of passengers and newspapers normally published at a rate of more than one issue per month)[4]
Estonia 0% on undistributed profits (25% on distributed profit[10]) 20% (+ 2.4% of unemployment insurance tax, 0.8% paid by employer, 1.6% paid by employee and 33% social security which is paid before gross wage by employer) around 57,8 in total 20% (reduced rate 9%)[4]
Finland 20% 56.05% to 62.05% depending on municipality, including 7.8%[11] social insurance fees and excluding employer contribution, which is on average 20.88%.[11] 24%[4][12] (reduced rate of 14% for groceries and restaurants, 10% for books, medicine, transport of passengers and some others)
France 33.3% (36.6% above 3.5M€, 15% below 38k€)[13] 49% (45% +4% for incomes above a yearly EUR 500,000) [14] 20% (reduced rate of 10%, 5.5%, 2.1% and 0% for specific cases like some food, transportation, cultural goods, etc.)[4][15]
Germany 30.175% to 33.325% (15.825% federal plus 14.35% to 17.5% local) additionally 18% pension and 15.5% Healthcare 45% (13.5% ca. entry level tax for income exceeding 8,004 EUR per year, and gradually rising in microscopic steps up to 45%; all income below the threshold of 8,004 EUR per year is not taxed - 0% tax rate). 19% (reduced rate of 7% applies e.g. on sales of certain foods, books and magazines, flowers and transports)[4]
Georgia 15% 20% 18%
Greece 29% 65.67% (45% for >40000€+ 7.5% Solidarity Tax for >40000€)+(26.95% Social Security for employees or up to 47.95% for private professionals) 24%[4] (13% for groceries)
Hungary 9% 15% (additional contributions at 10% Social Security by employee and 24% Social Security by employer and health care 7% by employer) 27%[4][16][17]
Iceland 20%[18] 46.24%[18] 24% (12% reduced rate)[18]
Ireland 12.5% on trading income and 25% for non-trading income 52% (PAYE income 40%; additional contributions at 4% Pay-Related Social Insurance (PRSI) and 8% Universal Social Charge (USC)).

A surcharge of 3% applies to people who have income from self-employment above €100,000, regardless of age.

23%[19]
Italy 31.4% (27.5% plus 3.9% municipal) 45% 22%[4]
Latvia 15% 23% 21% (reduced rates 12% and 0%)[20]
Liechtenstein 12.5% (2.5% on IP and royalties) 17.89% (11.6% Social security is shared between employer and employee) 100,000 USD income gives 7.6% income tax rate. 0% capital gains tax. 8%[21]
Lithuania 15% (5% for small businesses with up to 10 employees and up to €300,000 income) 55% (including 15% income tax, 34% social insurance, 6% health insurance)[22] 21%
Luxembourg 29.22% (commercial activity); 5.718% on intellectual property income, royalties; 0% on dividends and capital gains (under certain conditions in case of major participation) 40%[23] 17%[4]
Republic of Macedonia[24] 10% 37% [25] (includes income tax 10%, mandatory state pension 18%, mandatory public health insurance 7.3%, mandatory unemployment insurance 1.2%, mandatory personal injury insurance 0.5%) 18%
Malta 35% (6/7 or 5/7 tax refunds gives an effective rate of 5% or 10% for most companies[26]) 35% 18%[4]
Montenegro 9%[27] 9%[27] 17%[27]
Netherlands 25% above €200,000 of profit and otherwise 20%[28] 52%[29] 21%[30] (reduced rate of 6% and 0% for some goods and services)
Norway[31][32] 25% (proposed 22% by 2018 [33]) 46.9% (53.5% including 14.1% social security contribution by employer. All taxes include 8.2% pension fund payments). 25% (reduced rate of 15% for groceries, and 10% for transport and culture.)
Poland 19% 32% 23% (reduced rates of 5% and 8%)[4]
Portugal 21% 46.5% (additional contributions at 11% Social Security by employee and 23.75% Social Security by employer) 23% (reduced rates 13% and 6%)
Romania 16% 16% (additional 16.5% by the employee for social security contributions, i.e. health insurance, pension and unemployment fund); and additional 23% by the employer for various social security contributions)[34] 19% (5% for food; 9% for medicines, books, newspapers, hotel, or 4%)[4][35]
Serbia 15% 52% (capital gains tax 15%, standard income tax rate 10%, additional contributions by employee: 13% state pension fund, 6.5% state health fund, 0.5% unemployment fund; additional contributions by employer: 11% state pension fund, 6.5% state health fund, 0.5% unemployment; maximum contributions capped (amount changing monthly); additional tax for higher salaries (after 3 times average salary additional 10%, after 6 times average salary additional 15%)),[36][37][38] 20%
Slovakia 22% [39] 19% (additional contributions at 4% health care by employee and 10% health care by employer, 9.4% Social Security by employee and 19.4% Social Security by employer) 20%[4] (10% reduced rate)
Slovenia[40] 19% 50% 22%[4] (reduced rate 9.5%) – from 1 July 2013
Spain 28% (25% for SMEs, 4% ZEC companies in Canary Islands) 42% 21%[4] (reduced rates 10% and 4%)
Sweden 22% 67% including social security paid by employer[41] 25%[4] (reduced rates 12% and 6%)
Switzerland 16.55% 30% 8% / 2.5%[42]
Ukraine 18% 17% 20%
United Kingdom 19% (18% from 2020)[43] 47% (45% income tax + 2% NI)

45% (additional rate) income tax on annual income above £150,000, 40% (higher rate) between £43,001 and £150,000, 20% (basic rate) between £0 and £43,000. There is also a National Insurance levy between 2% and 13.8% for employees and self-employed individuals but capital gains and dividend income is not subject to NI. The first £11,000 is tax-free if your annual income is below £100,000.

Capital gains is taxed at 10% (or 18% on residential property) for basic rate taxpayers and 20% (or 28% on residential property) for higher and additional rate taxpayers. Dividend income from UK companies is taxed at 7.5% for basic rate taxpayers, 32.5% for higher rate taxpayers and 38.1% for additional rate taxpayers.

20% (reduced rate of 5% for home energy and renovations, 0% for life necessities – groceries, water, prescription medications, medical equipment and supplies, public transport, children's clothing, books and periodicals)[4]